News

Tuesday, September 25, 2018

The Times Editorial Board’s opposition to Assembly Bill 1951, which would allow school districts to swap the state proficiency exams for 11th graders for the SAT or ACT test instead, is misguided. This bill, currently awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature, is an opportunity for California to give greater control to local school districts and for students of all backgrounds to have a better chance at succeeding on the SAT, an exam already used by many colleges to help determine readiness for admissions.

Earlier this month, the editorial board opposed legislation that would have forced school districts to delay start times until after 8:30 a.m. In that instance, the board felt that local control trumped Sacramento’s wish to dictate the “minutiae” of school operations. Brown wisely concurred by vetoing that legislation.

Tuesday, September 11, 2018

For too many California families, the college application process is expensive and hard to navigate. Fortunately, there’s a solution that would propel more students to be eligible for college admissions.

Giving local school districts the power to choose how students are tested in grade 11 would improve access to college for students of every zip code, ability, and language proficiency level.

Thursday, August 30, 2018

Among the torrent of legislation California lawmakers approved this week are bills mandating school safety plans and classroom door locks and a bill allowing school personnel to file a gun violence restraining order. They are now awaiting Gov. Jerry Brown’s signature — or veto.

None are high-profile items like the bills calling for armed officers in every school and a vast increase in the number of mental health practitioners in schools, which were proposed after the February massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. The armed officer bill died in the Assembly and the Legislature passed a drastically scaled-back version of the mental health bill.

Friday, August 17, 2018

California often leads the nation in innovation, including in our public schools. But in the key area of high school testing, several other states have progressed beyond California when it comes to making these assessments more relevant and meaningful to students and their families.

In support of college readiness, states like Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Maine and Michigan have received the federal government’s blessing to administer the SAT as part of their state-adopted assessment program. More and more states like these are exercising greater local control when it comes to assessing students in grade 11, and importantly, they are doing so while respecting the needs of special education students and English language learners.

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

White sharks are being sighted off the California coast more than ever before. As the species interacts more and more with humans, researchers find themselves in need of more funding—and beachgoers will have to reevaluate their relationship with an animal most famous for its villainous role on the silver screen.

When writer Peter Benchley heard about a 4,550-pound shark that was caught near Montauk in 1964, he became fascinated. He jumped aboard fishing boats to hear stories of great white encounters, dove in cages to get looks up close, and eventually wrote his own fictional narrative in 1974, titled Jaws. The subsequent 1975 Steven Spielberg film—about a rogue, 25-foot-long white shark that developed a taste for human flesh and terrorized a small New England town—ignited a fear of sharks that has lasted for generations.

Friday, March 9, 2018

By ANDREW EDWARDS | aedwards@scng.com | Press-Telegram

PUBLISHED: March 9, 2018 at 10:12 am | UPDATED: March 9, 2018 at 7:57 pm

Community Medical Center Long Beach has stopped accepting emergency room patients receiving advanced life support care from paramedics.

Long Beach’s city government released a statement that said MemorialCare Health System, which operates the East Long Beach hospital, told city government on Wednesday that patients receiving advanced life support from paramedics would need to go to other hospitals as of Thursday.

 

Friday, January 5, 2018

By Assemblymember Patrick O'Donnell

Schools must prepare students for college — or for work.

Every good paying job does not require a college degree and every student is not going to get a college degree. Statistics support these facts. Thankfully, California’s education policy is starting to support these facts as well.

Approximately 30 years ago, California educational policy altered its course. It went from a model that offered students “multiple paths” to success (i.e., vocational opportunities) to a “one-size-fits-all” approach in which every student would get a four-year university degree.

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