News

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

White sharks are being sighted off the California coast more than ever before. As the species interacts more and more with humans, researchers find themselves in need of more funding—and beachgoers will have to reevaluate their relationship with an animal most famous for its villainous role on the silver screen.

When writer Peter Benchley heard about a 4,550-pound shark that was caught near Montauk in 1964, he became fascinated. He jumped aboard fishing boats to hear stories of great white encounters, dove in cages to get looks up close, and eventually wrote his own fictional narrative in 1974, titled Jaws. The subsequent 1975 Steven Spielberg film—about a rogue, 25-foot-long white shark that developed a taste for human flesh and terrorized a small New England town—ignited a fear of sharks that has lasted for generations.

Friday, March 9, 2018

By ANDREW EDWARDS | aedwards@scng.com | Press-Telegram

PUBLISHED: March 9, 2018 at 10:12 am | UPDATED: March 9, 2018 at 7:57 pm

Community Medical Center Long Beach has stopped accepting emergency room patients receiving advanced life support care from paramedics.

Long Beach’s city government released a statement that said MemorialCare Health System, which operates the East Long Beach hospital, told city government on Wednesday that patients receiving advanced life support from paramedics would need to go to other hospitals as of Thursday.

 

Friday, January 5, 2018

By Assemblymember Patrick O'Donnell

Schools must prepare students for college — or for work.

Every good paying job does not require a college degree and every student is not going to get a college degree. Statistics support these facts. Thankfully, California’s education policy is starting to support these facts as well.

Approximately 30 years ago, California educational policy altered its course. It went from a model that offered students “multiple paths” to success (i.e., vocational opportunities) to a “one-size-fits-all” approach in which every student would get a four-year university degree.

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Thursday, July 20, 2017

By Amy Jesse, Elizabeth Oreck and Susan Riggs

Bringing a new puppy or kitten home should be a wonderful and rewarding experience, but consumers who purchase their new family member from a pet shop may not be getting the dog or cat they’ve been promised. Despite enticing claims that they only source from humane, small-scale breeders, pet stores across the country supply unsuspecting consumers with animals from puppy and kitten “mills.”

Saturday, July 8, 2017

By David Bernazani

To the editor: The Times is correct to support a state bill to ban pet stores from selling cats, dogs and rabbits bred for that purpose. (“That puppy in the window may have come from a bad breeder,” editorial, July 5) When I worked as a veterinary technician in a public animal shelter near San Francisco, I was appalled at the constant flow of animals that were dumped there every day.

Thursday, June 8, 2017

As excerpted from 89.3 KPCC.

California public schools are facing a shortage of teachers — specifically, a shortage of teachers qualified to teach math, science, bilingual or special education.

So state lawmakers are considering making an offer to prospective teachers: commit to teach in these high-need subjects and we'll take a bite out of your tuition costs.

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

As excerpted from The 74. 

The California Assembly has approved two bills protecting undocumented immigrant students on school property.